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I purchase a Toyota chr 2018 and it has 80,000 miles, I was just informed that the extended warranty does not cover it and to change the transmission is going to cost me 9,000$. This is highly disappointing as I have service my car regularly and is supposed to be a reliable car.
Sorry about your issues. But having your care serviced regularly does not mean you've done everything you needed to do. If you read through this thread, I've been saying everyone needs to get the trans fluid changed in their CVT trans regularly. Preferably by 50k miles. This service is not listed in the service schedule provided by Toyota. My trans is approaching 92k miles with no issues.

As to extended warranties/service contracts, you have to read the fine details as not all warranties are created equal. There will be listed exclusions and specifics on what they will cover. I always read through the fine print to understand if such a warranty is worth paying for.
 

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AVOID this car at ALL COST!! Toyota C-HR is a ticking LEMON Back in June of 2017, I was very excited to be the owner of a brand new Toyota C-HR 2018 XLE Premium. I barely got any discounts off the car even though the Rav4 was over 5k off MSRP making this car nearly as expensive as a 2017 Rav4 AWD XLE, but I loved the new looks so I sucked it up. Even though the rav4’s got better just about everything under the hood than the C-HR. Little did I know this was going to be the biggest mistake I ever made purchasing a car. You see, I was a Toyota fanboy having in the past put 280k miles on my 2009 Sienna in a few years. I worked that thing hard, and it toughed it out like a beast. I had brand trust and trusted the quality of the brand and mistakenly placed that trust on to the car. I did not know at the time that this car was made in Turkey. Didn't know that it mattered that much, but apparently, it did. All the complaints I’ve read online talked about the cheap crap metal used in the manufacturing of this car. The transmission started to hum. And after spending lots of time and money going from one shop to another, and even to Toyota during maintenance. No one told me what the problem was. It was only when one of the shops suggested it was a Transmission problem that I took it to Toyota, only for them to charge me $150 to tell me my Transmission was broken and needs to be replaced. They were very eager to sell me it too, at $9,100 for the parts and labor, as if I had that kind of money lying around. Scowing the internet, you find a lot of other unhappy owners of Toyota 2018 C-HR. I don’t have the money to repair the car, and I don’t have the money for a new car. I don’t believe a car should die and need such a big repair before even reaching 100k miles. My Sienna lasted me many years before I sold it in great condition. I also own a Rav4, and I just checked it, lucky it's made in Japan so hopefully it will last me many years to come. After changing new tires, spark plugs and other things you normally do near 100k only to find out it needs a new transmission is really tough, being short a vehicle has me unemployed. The car battery suddenly died too, requiring me to manually open the car with the key and jumping it just to start up. Not that I’d want to though, from all the terrible noise the transmission makes.
 

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AVOID this car at ALL COST!! Toyota C-HR is a ticking LEMON Back in June of 2017, I was very excited to be the owner of a brand new Toyota C-HR 2018 XLE Premium. I barely got any discounts off the car even though the Rav4 was over 5k off MSRP making this car nearly as expensive as a 2017 Rav4 AWD XLE, but I loved the new looks so I sucked it up. Even though the rav4’s got better just about everything under the hood than the C-HR. Little did I know this was going to be the biggest mistake I ever made purchasing a car. You see, I was a Toyota fanboy having in the past put 280k miles on my 2009 Sienna in a few years. I worked that thing hard, and it toughed it out like a beast. I had brand trust and trusted the quality of the brand and mistakenly placed that trust on to the car. I did not know at the time that this car was made in Turkey. Didn't know that it mattered that much, but apparently, it did. All the complaints I’ve read online talked about the cheap crap metal used in the manufacturing of this car. The transmission started to hum. And after spending lots of time and money going from one shop to another, and even to Toyota during maintenance. No one told me what the problem was. It was only when one of the shops suggested it was a Transmission problem that I took it to Toyota, only for them to charge me $150 to tell me my Transmission was broken and needs to be replaced. They were very eager to sell me it too, at $9,100 for the parts and labor, as if I had that kind of money lying around. Scowing the internet, you find a lot of other unhappy owners of Toyota 2018 C-HR. I don’t have the money to repair the car, and I don’t have the money for a new car. I don’t believe a car should die and need such a big repair before even reaching 100k miles. My Sienna lasted me many years before I sold it in great condition. I also own a Rav4, and I just checked it, lucky it's made in Japan so hopefully it will last me many years to come. After changing new tires, spark plugs and other things you normally do near 100k only to find out it needs a new transmission is really tough, being short a vehicle has me unemployed. The car battery suddenly died too, requiring me to manually open the car with the key and jumping it just to start up. Not that I’d want to though, from all the terrible noise the transmission makes.
1) Sorry about your problems.
2) Did you read any part of this thread before posting?
3) NONE of the powertrain components are manufactured in Turkey. NONE. The transmission is an Aisin unit that is built in Japan. Our cars are ASSEMBLED in Turkey. Only a few body parts are manufactured in Turkey for our cars.
4) It's unfortunate, but ALL CVT transmissions require regular fluid changes. Of all that have responded here with transmission problems, NOT one has replied back to my constant questioning of if they have had any fluid service done to their CVT transmissions. NOT one. It does appear these problems seem to be isolated to 2018 model year cars. I did some research on the part numbers for 2018 and 2019 model year car transmissions. They both have the same part number. Usually if there is an update to the transmission, a new part number is issued. Not say there wasn't any updates done that are not reflected in the part number. But it's just guessing. One forum member that has replied to this thread has a 2018 and has done a fluid service to his transmission.

Per my signature, my C-HR is a 2019. I've crossed over 92k miles and still haven't had any issues with my transmission. I have had fluid service done at around 60k miles which is a bit later than it should have been done. I'll be doing another fluid service when my car hits 95k miles.
 

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Yell at them. Toyota has chosen to not disclose that the fluid in the trans should be replaced at regular intervals. How can one be informed if it's intentionally removed from the routine service list.
 

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1) Sorry about your problems.
2) Did you read any part of this thread before posting?
3) NONE of the powertrain components are manufactured in Turkey. NONE. The transmission is an Aisin unit that is built in Japan. Our cars are ASSEMBLED in Turkey. Only a few body parts are manufactured in Turkey for our cars.
4) It's unfortunate, but ALL CVT transmissions require regular fluid changes. Of all that have responded here with transmission problems, NOT one has replied back to my constant questioning of if they have had any fluid service done to their CVT transmissions. NOT one. It does appear these problems seem to be isolated to 2018 model year cars. I did some research on the part numbers for 2018 and 2019 model year car transmissions. They both have the same part number. Usually if there is an update to the transmission, a new part number is issued. Not say there wasn't any updates done that are not reflected in the part number. But it's just guessing. One forum member that has replied to this thread has a 2018 and has done a fluid service to his transmission.

Per my signature, my C-HR is a 2019. I've crossed over 92k miles and still haven't had any issues with my transmission. I have had fluid service done at around 60k miles which is a bit later than it should have been done. I'll be doing another fluid service when my car hits 95k miles.
Hello, just read your response and you make it sound so easy than it actually is; but Im all for good news, I like my 2018 CHR.
I mentioned this bit of the transmission oil been changed to the dealer I bought mine from, and he said "these cars' transmission oil can't be changed, they do no have a dipstick" ...so what is it then ?
I'm willing to have a tranny oil / fluids change long as it resolves the issue.
 

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I have a Toyota 2018 CHR. I have never owned a car with over 80,000 miles because I was too worried something would happened to it. Everyone said my Toyota would last for 200,000 miles. I’ve taken great care of it I’ve had the tires and the oil serviced like clockwork. It just rolled over 110,000. All my miles. The crazy noise it has been making in the past three weeks was finally determined that my complete transmission needs to be replaced. I’ve had quotes from $8000-$10,000 and I’m flipping out… I still owe 13,000 on it. What do you even do? I’m going to war with the Toyota dealership tomorrow. Help!
Hi, so what was the outcome? Still at war with Toyota?
Its bothersome, if this much people have complained, why isn't Toyota doing something about it ?
🤷🏾‍♂️
 

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Yell at them. Toyota has chosen to not disclose that the fluid in the trans should be replaced at regular intervals. How can one be informed if it's intentionally removed from the routine service list.
Toyota is not the only one doing this. BMW has the same stance along with many other manufacturers. The unfortunate part is people put emphasis on "low" maintenance as a buying criteria. Add that to how many Americans change cars like underwear, the manufacturers are banking on cars being dumped into the used market onto a second or third owner.
 

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Hello, just read your response and you make it sound so easy than it actually is; but Im all for good news, I like my 2018 CHR.
I mentioned this bit of the transmission oil been changed to the dealer I bought mine from, and he said "these cars' transmission oil can't be changed, they do no have a dipstick" ...so what is it then ?
I'm willing to have a tranny oil / fluids change long as it resolves the issue.
The person at your dealer is an idiot. Point blank full stop. It's obvious this person has no clue about these transmissions. If you go back and look at the video links I've posted up about servicing these transmissions, yes, there is no dipstick. But there is a fill plug on the side of the transmission AND a drain plug with an integral plastic level tube. To service this transmission. The fluid is drained as normal by removing the drain plug and the plastic level tube. The plastic tube is placed back into the trans pan fitting and filled up. The engine is then started. You have to monitor the trans temperature with a scan tool. When the temperature reaches a certain temp, you add trans fluid until it drains out. This part is critical as to fill the trans to the proper level, the fluid has to be at a temperature range as trans fluid expands when heated up. Then screw back on the drain plug.

I chose to have a shop do mine which they used a trans flush machine as I don't want the hassle of having to suspend my car in the air with jack stands to get it level and then screwing around under the car to fill the trans while monitoring the trans temp. I have a scan tool which I can see the data stream from all the various computer components in the car.

The other method is draining the fluid out of the trans and measuring what comes out. Then adding back in the exact amount. I don't know if I fully trust this method.

BTW, my car is approaching 93,000 miles with NO transmission problems.
 
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Yes, like zx10guy says - That dealer was an idiot. I got my 2018 C-HR transmission done (mentioned in this thread) at 30k miles. They did a CVT fluid flush service. At 60k - I want them to drop the pan and change the filter - yes it has one.
 
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The person at your dealer is an idiot. Point blank full stop. It's obvious this person has no clue about these transmissions. If you go back and look at the video links I've posted up about servicing these transmissions, yes, there is no dipstick. But there is a fill plug on the side of the transmission AND a drain plug with an integral plastic level tube. To service this transmission. The fluid is drained as normal by removing the drain plug and the plastic level tube. The plastic tube is placed back into the trans pan fitting and filled up. The engine is then started. You have to monitor the trans temperature with a scan tool. When the temperature reaches a certain temp, you add trans fluid until it drains out. This part is critical as to fill the trans to the proper level, the fluid has to be at a temperature range as trans fluid expands when heated up. Then screw back on the drain plug.

I chose to have a shop do mine which they used a trans flush machine as I don't want the hassle of having to suspend my car in the air with jack stands to get it level and then screwing around under the car to fill the trans while monitoring the trans temp. I have a scan tool which I can see the data stream from all the various computer components in the car.

The other method is draining the fluid out of the trans and measuring what comes out. Then adding back in the exact amount. I don't know if I fully trust this method.

BTW, my car is approaching 93,000 miles with NO transmission problems.
Thanks for a lengthy response, mine's around 86k miles, the dealer got someone to look i to it, I guess they tubed something, the humming noise's gone, feels like it runs like a normal car should at the moment...
Another dealer I had reached out to ( for a 2nd opinion ) also advised against doing a trans flush, but said I would be made to sign a waiver in case anything goes wrong afterwards.. hilarious !!
I will just keep driving it for now, I have extended warranty on it ( yet to discover what it covers )
 

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Yes, like zx10guy says - That dealer was an idiot. I got my 2018 C-HR transmission done (mentioned in this thread) at 30k miles. They did a CVT fluid flush service. At 60k - I want them to drop the pan and change the filter - yes it has one.
You had a flush at 30k miles?
You've barely driven the car.
So everything is fine & working good?
PS: I had an aftermarket Apple CarPlay installed, quite shameful for a 2018 vehicle not to have a navigation sys & all other cool stuff.
 

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You had a flush at 30k miles?
You've barely driven the car.
So everything is fine & working good?
PS: I had an aftermarket Apple CarPlay installed, quite shameful for a 2018 vehicle not to have a navigation sys & all other cool stuff.
Yes. He is doing it right with these transmissions. One of my posts has a video link to a Youtube video done by the Car Wizard. The car in question was a Nissan but it has a CVT. He dropped the pan and showed the condition of the oil and stuff in the pan after only 20k miles. It was eye opening. The Car Wizard actually recommends annual oil changes for any CVT car. I think that's excessive. I had my first fluid service done around 65k miles. I'm actually going to switch over to 30k mile intervals. So I'm due in a few thousand miles for my second trans fluid service.

Everyone has to keep in mind CVTs are total junk in general. They're not the same as a fully geared auto transmission.
 
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Yes. He is doing it right with these transmissions. One of my posts has a video link to a Youtube video done by the Car Wizard. The car in question was a Nissan but it has a CVT. He dropped the pan and showed the condition of the oil and stuff in the pan after only 20k miles. It was eye opening. The Car Wizard actually recommends annual oil changes for any CVT car. I think that's excessive. I had my first fluid service done around 65k miles. I'm actually going to switch over to 30k mile intervals. So I'm due in a few thousand miles for my second trans fluid service.

Everyone has to keep in mind CVTs are total junk in general. They're not the same as a fully geared auto transmission.
This CVT thing just weakens me, why build something that can self destruct your entire brand.
I guess I will make plans to invest inna flush some time down the road.
 

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This CVT thing just weakens me, why build something that can self destruct your entire brand.
I guess I will make plans to invest inna flush some time down the road.
It's the drive by all car manufacturers to reduce cost and packaging size of the transmission; plus fuel economy. CVTs by their design is just junk. Doesn't matter which manufacturer. When you have two variable pulleys to simulate gears and a single metal drive belt that is the method of transferring power to the wheels, you have a timebomb waiting to happen. Of all the transmissions out there, Aisin CVTs are generally regarded as one of the best which is what is in our cars. But had I done more research as I assumed all cars in the price/category of the C-HR are using CVTs, I would have gone with Mazda. Mazda still uses (at least when I looked last) fully geared auto transmissions.
 
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You had a flush at 30k miles?
You've barely driven the car.
So everything is fine & working good?
PS: I had an aftermarket Apple CarPlay installed, quite shameful for a 2018 vehicle not to have a navigation sys & all other cool stuff.
Yes, flush at 30k miles - Had to do some research and watched a Subaru video about how to live with a CVT. My Rav4 is my daily beater. The vehicle seems to be normal - getting closer to 35k miles. I really like the Bridgestone tires I got installed last month 😁
 
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Sorry guys, unfortunately, you aren't alone...
I purchased a used 2018 C-HR and it hit 89,000 miles on in I started to hear this whinning noise and a day or two later this horrible noise and it was the transmission it had to be replaced thankfully It was a certified used car and it was covered however a new transmission is almost $10,000 plus labor which is outragous and no way should it be that much if it wasn't under I owe a little over $10,000 dollars and if it wasn't under warranty I would have just junked the car.
 

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Can we ask for a refund or recall , seem like everybody have transmission issue
I asked for refund and recall too. After two years of taking my car back and forth to Toyota with the same issue they finally admitted the issues (transmission/gearbox) since 2020.
I have a 2017 model that’s out of warranty but I kept arguing with Toyota and they have agreed to replace e and fix it for free.
 

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Yes….my 2019 had the fluid serviced and failed at around 80k km. The transmission was replaced…. And the second one has now failed. agree….this is a Lemon!
1) Sorry about your problems. 2) Did you read any part of this thread before posting? 3) NONE of the powertrain components are manufactured in Turkey. NONE. The transmission is an Aisin unit that is built in Japan. Our cars are ASSEMBLED in Turkey. Only a few body parts are manufactured in Turkey for our cars. 4) It's unfortunate, but ALL CVT transmissions require regular fluid changes. Of all that have responded here with transmission problems, NOT one has replied back to my constant questioning of if they have had any fluid service done to their CVT transmissions. NOT one. It does appear these problems seem to be isolated to 2018 model year cars. I did some research on the part numbers for 2018 and 2019 model year car transmissions. They both have the same part number. Usually if there is an update to the transmission, a new part number is issued. Not say there wasn't any updates done that are not reflected in the part number. But it's just guessing. One forum member that has replied to this thread has a 2018 and has done a fluid service to his transmission. Per my signature, my C-HR is a 2019. I've crossed over 92k miles and still haven't had any issues with my transmission. I have had fluid service done at around 60k miles which is a bit later than it should have been done. I'll be doing another fluid service when my car hits 95k miles.
 

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Yes….my 2019 had the fluid serviced and failed at around 80k km. The transmission was replaced…. And the second one has now failed. agree….this is a Lemon!
What exactly was serviced? Was it just a drain and fill or a thorough flush? What was the determination of the failure of your first trans? What is the failure for the second trans?

My 2019 is over 100k miles and have had two full trans flushes with no issues with my transmission.
 
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