Toyota C-HR Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #1


Introduced in production form at the 2016 Geneva Motor Show, Toyota’s new compact crossover SUV with a bold design language is expected to boost the Japanese automotive giant’s hybrid sales in Europe.

In an interview with Automotive News, Toyota Europe CEO Johan van Zyl was asked to give an estimation of how many C-HRs Toyota will sell in Europe and his answer was a substantial 50,000 to 100,000 units. Out of that number, 70% of the C-HRs sold in Europe are expected to be the hybrid variant. That could be an accurate estimation considering the fact that the Auris hybrid sales are already reaching around 60% in Western Europe.

This is just the beginning, by 2020 Toyota wants half of its European sales to be comprised of hybrids and right now they’re at 31%. A goal that’ll Toyota will try to meet by offering a hybrid version of every model in their range.

Produced in Turkey, the C-HR will be offered with a 115 hp 1.2-litre turbo engine or a 122 hp 1.8-litre hybrid powertrain. The 1.8-litre petrol hybrid system was borrowed from the Prius and it should deliver less than 90g/Km of CO2 emissions.

The much anticipated C-HR is expected to launch in Europe by the end of this year with the U.S. market following later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
1.2L turbo. With it having such a small motor with low power numbers should I expect trans issues for overworking it ?!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
best to stay away from these for a while then
i rather give it at least 6 months to a year running with that powerplant before deciding if i want to buy in or not
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
551 Posts
Toyota hybrids (and maybe hybrids overall) are known for slow torque increases during low RPM conditions and considering how efficient of a vehicle this is set out to be, that falls in line with what's expected of it and this segment.

But in the end there's no telling how they could slightly change torque distribution on this compared to other Toyota hybrid models. We just have to wait and see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
From what I've read, the slow torque increases during low rpms is coming from the engine itself but when paired with the electric motor the total torque output from the low end is great.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Torque at low RPMs is really what you need the most in city driving which the C-HR will undoubtedly do a lot of. It kind of plateaus around 3000 to 4000 rpm, but that's fine. Great steady increase of power too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
410 Posts
Toyota Europe hybrid sales has been on a rise this year, around 45% and the C-HR may push it to 50% and more. This is great news for hybrid buyers like us because automakers will be more wiling to develop more hybrids if the sales returns is high.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
Torque at low RPMs is really what you need the most in city driving which the C-HR will undoubtedly do a lot of. It kind of plateaus around 3000 to 4000 rpm, but that's fine. Great steady increase of power too.
Although it wasn't a C-HR dyno graph, we can get the general idea from it. The main thing is like you said, the lower rpm ranges need the torque because of city driving.

I really think the C-HR will make quite the impact when it comes out for sales.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top